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How to Write a Report on a Book?

May 25th, 2011 No comments

Writing a report on a book requires summarizing a great deal of information in several pages only. When writing a report, what you have to do is to extract the key ideas from the book and make an analysis of it. No matter if you’re writing a business report example or a literature report, you have to make it to be a presentable report. Follow these simple steps of how to write a report on a book and make the assignment easier.

  • State the main point of the book: Why did the author write the book? Or for fiction, give a brief plot summary.
  • Make notes in the process of reading the book. Mark the pages with the Post-it flags in order to remember important quotes later.
  • Put all the notes you have made in a logical order and have them by your side together with the book as you work on the report.
  • Put a question to yourself “What info would I like to know about the book I have read?”. You may look through the notes you have written down, they will help you to make up your mind concerning what is of a greater importance and what can be skipped.
  • Develop an outline for the plot of the book. If you’re working with fiction literature, you may point out the main dramatic moments of the book.
  • When writing a report one should follow the outline. Make sure your paper includes a proper balance of the specific and the general. Remember, a good book report is the one that includes general book’s significance overview and as much as necessary details to avoid too much abstraction.
  • Make a summery of the book significance. Was this book a contribution to the literature world and the life of people? Did the author bring some answers to the timeless life questions?

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Prostate Cancer Essay

September 24th, 2009 No comments

The prostate gland is located between the bladder and in front of the rectum. The upper part of the urethra passes through the prostate gland, which can cause some serious problems if it becomes enlarged. They believe that the cancer is caused by changes in DNA. The reason for this is because some parts of the DNA give instructions to the cell about growth and division. This is where cancer comes into play, which is the division of cells gone mad. The genes that promote cell growth and division are oncogenes. When this happens, it creates a tumor. The tumor will either be benign or malignant. Benign tumors do not spread like the malignant ones. When a malignant tumor spreads, it is called metastasis. Prostate cancer is when a malignant tumor is found in the prostate gland. The severity determines what stage the cancer is in, it will be in T1, T2, T3, or T4. “T1 and T2 are limited only to the prostate gland.”(source 1) T3 is when the cancer has already made its way into the tissue. T4 is when the cancer is spread all across the body. There are three types of prostate diseases: benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis, and prostate cancer. Read more…

Seamus Heaney Essay

September 3rd, 2009 No comments

“Blackberry-picking,” by Seamus Heaney, can be seen as a multi layered cake. There is the obvious physical attraction of a beautifully written poem as there is a grandly frosted cake, but once tasted, the poem can tell different stories as a cake can reveal different flavors. There is a literal reading of the poem, but the poem can also be read as a struggle between man and nature and the natural mental progression from childhood through adult hood.

Man possesses a preoccupation with opposing and fighting the world in which he lives. In spite of all the good that nature has done unto him, man possesses an inherent force, perhaps stemming from the Freudian id (the one of the three divisions of the psyche in psychoanalytic theory that is completely unconscious and is the source of psychic energy derived from instinctual needs and drives), which causes him to create conflict with the rest of the universe. (http://www.m-w.com) Throughout literature, humans have tried to oppose nature. Such epics as Beowulf and Gilgamesh contain heroes that fight against nature’s creation but suffer a tragic end and the hands of the universe. In “Blackberry-Picking,” Seamus Heaney grasps this theme of the eternal conflict between nature and man, and impresses this premise into an idea as simple as blackberry-picking. The author reverses the common structure of the words “Picking Blackberries” to “Blackberry-Picking.” This reversal may signify the importance of “Blackberries” from the singular form “Blackberry,” thereby leading the reader to infer that the poem transcends the denotation of picking blackberries. Also, the singular form of the title may serve to emphasize that Heaney focuses the poem on one single theme which pervades the entirety of the poem. Through the physical notion of the action of blackberry-picking, Seamus Heaney employs poetic devices ranging from imagery to metaphor; illuminating his universal theme of the eternal struggle of the force of man versus the force of nature. Read more…

Macbeth Essay

August 17th, 2009 No comments

Shakespeare’s Macbeth, is a twisting, turning, very dramatic play. There are characters whom may seem honorable one minute and villainous the next. The play goes through many scene and setting changes, but the overall theme remains the same. The dark envious nature of Macbeth plays out through the play’s entirety. The chief character in the tragedy, Macbeth himself, is progressively isolated, and increasingly cut off from his family, friends, the public, and even with himself. The play begins with Macbeth shown as a strong fighter and a hero. This image, however, is challenged once Macbeth interacts with the witches; which proves him to be weak minded but at the same time ambitious. While being in an inner turmoil of clashing qualities, Macbeth allows himself to put his guard down and thus to be easily manipulated by the witches and his wife. At the end of the play, a cycle seems to form in which Macbeth returns to the battle field and dies in combat. Macbeth is a dynamic character: in the beginning, he is a loyal, trustworthy warrior and Thane to Scotland’s King Duncan, until, that is, he meets the witches, who prophesize of his greatness, and becomes weak minded and frantic about keeping his throne to the point of collapsing. Read more…

The Great Gatsby Essay

June 4th, 2009 No comments

Fitzgerald decided to employ a narrator who was a participant in the story, but was more an observer than an actor. This creates a complex point of view, which involves us, as readers, in acts of interpretation, which eventually lets us make judgments about the narrator. The qualities that Fitzgerald has given to the narrator, Nick Carraway, are those of a privileged background. But from the advice that was given to him by his father, this makes him aware that some people may not have the same privileges and opportunities as himself, which allows him to make good judgments, for example, “In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments.” So from this the reader can see that he looks at all sides of opinions, and does not make snap decisions, which allows people to tell him their secrets because he is trustworthy, impartial and holds back his judgments. Which is why in the story, so many people open up to him. This impartiality allows the characters in the novel to be open with him, which is a good quality for a narrator, because he has their confidence, “Listen, Nick; let me tell you what is said when she was born. Would you like to hear?” This proves that he is the ideal listener and as such is accepted by the reader. Read more…

The Scarlet Letter Essay

June 4th, 2009 No comments

The Puritans of Boston make a victim of Hester Prynne in The Scarlet Letter for her sin of adultery by putting her in jail, by publicly condemning her, by forcing her to wear a scarlet on her bosom for the rest of her life, and by out casting her from society.

Hester Prynne’s crime of adultery with Arthur Dimmesdale, the town reverend, depicts a serious crime, worthy of being put in jail, especially in the 1770s, when the people of Massachusetts depicted a very pious group of Puritans. It was a time when you could be punished for committing a minor sin, like not attending church on a Sunday. In Hester’s case, her husband fails to join her in Boston after migrating from Europe and she begins to engage in sexual relations with Reverend Dimmesdale. The author of the book, Nathaniel Hawthorne, commences the book to her first punishment, Hester serving a jail sentence (page 35). If the community wasnТt Puritan, Hester would have been looked down upon; however, she would not have been subjected to punishments worse than her crime. Read more…