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How to Write a Good Term Paper

June 12th, 2009 No comments

Writing a good Term paper begins with a subject of your choice, questions that you want to answer – because you do not know the answer or because the answers are interesting. You will need to be sure that your questions can be researched and are developed in relationship to your course work. In some cases, your instructor may provide the question and you will be responsible for locating the answers. Your answers can be found in libraries, online databases, and in websites. When developing the answers to your questions you will need to be certain you are representing both facts and opinions in order to develop a clear relationship between your answers and the original questions.

As you write your term paper, be certain to seek out clarification if you find that some of your research is vague. You may wish to seek out original or historical references that further demonstrate where the information or questions originated, or build answers in a sequential event fashion demonstrating how the answers to your question has changed over the years. Many different answers have changed in the past few decades, and millions more over the past few centuries. Where your answers begin or the historical reference to the first time the question was asked could provide valuable insight to your term paper and demonstrate a great understanding of the questions and material presented in your class. Read more…

How to Write a Good Essay

June 8th, 2009 No comments

Today we are looking at how to write a good essay. Simply start with the topic and begin to brainstorm ideas that will enable you to work on the essay. Following that, determine which idea is the best option, and develop an outline that includes an Introduction, Body, and Conclusion. Your introduction will include what your paper will be about and encourage your audience to read on through the information presented. The body of your paper will include background information on your subject or topic, current information, related information, and research you developed. Your conclusion will list off the key-points of your essay and make the closing statements, but should not include new information not already present in the paper. Read more…

The Great Gatsby Essay

June 4th, 2009 No comments

Fitzgerald decided to employ a narrator who was a participant in the story, but was more an observer than an actor. This creates a complex point of view, which involves us, as readers, in acts of interpretation, which eventually lets us make judgments about the narrator. The qualities that Fitzgerald has given to the narrator, Nick Carraway, are those of a privileged background. But from the advice that was given to him by his father, this makes him aware that some people may not have the same privileges and opportunities as himself, which allows him to make good judgments, for example, “In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments.” So from this the reader can see that he looks at all sides of opinions, and does not make snap decisions, which allows people to tell him their secrets because he is trustworthy, impartial and holds back his judgments. Which is why in the story, so many people open up to him. This impartiality allows the characters in the novel to be open with him, which is a good quality for a narrator, because he has their confidence, “Listen, Nick; let me tell you what is said when she was born. Would you like to hear?” This proves that he is the ideal listener and as such is accepted by the reader. Read more…

The Scarlet Letter Essay

June 4th, 2009 No comments

The Puritans of Boston make a victim of Hester Prynne in The Scarlet Letter for her sin of adultery by putting her in jail, by publicly condemning her, by forcing her to wear a scarlet on her bosom for the rest of her life, and by out casting her from society.

Hester Prynne’s crime of adultery with Arthur Dimmesdale, the town reverend, depicts a serious crime, worthy of being put in jail, especially in the 1770s, when the people of Massachusetts depicted a very pious group of Puritans. It was a time when you could be punished for committing a minor sin, like not attending church on a Sunday. In Hester’s case, her husband fails to join her in Boston after migrating from Europe and she begins to engage in sexual relations with Reverend Dimmesdale. The author of the book, Nathaniel Hawthorne, commences the book to her first punishment, Hester serving a jail sentence (page 35). If the community wasnТt Puritan, Hester would have been looked down upon; however, she would not have been subjected to punishments worse than her crime. Read more…